Academic Recovery

Ivy Scholars Academics helps students ages 12-25 recover from interruptions to their education and succeed in junior high, high school and university. In addition to tutoring and test prep, we help students understand the approach that best fits their learning style and build the self-management skills to reach their educational potential.

Ivy Scholars Academics helps students ages 12-25 recover from interruptions to their education and succeed in junior high, high school and university. In addition to tutoring and test prep, we help students understand the approach that best fits their learning style and build the self-management skills to reach their educational potential.

Who’s This For?

Most of our students have felt anxiety and depression over poor academic performance. Some of our students have also experienced low motivation, substance addiction, neurological deficits, thought and mood disorders, traumatic brain injury, Asperger’s syndrome, Autism, and/or conduct issues. Others have experienced trauma, awkward school transitions, or disruptive life events. Ivy Scholars works in concert with psychologists, social workers, and counselors to provide academic support for students undergoing mental health treatment.

What We Do

We create strategic plans, provide one-on-one coaching for academic content and cognitive processing deficits, and build learning techniques with each student. Students develop organizational abilities in concert with academic ones with a focus on independent achievement. We work with parents to help students build motivation, organization, and direction in their studies to combat anxiety and procrastination.

How We Work

We establish coaching relationships with students and meet on a weekly basis to review academic work and implement recovery strategies. To best accommodate our students, in-office, in-home, phone, and videochat meetings are available during evenings and weekends.

Letter From Our Founder

Dear Parents,

It happens step by step.

Most students come to Ivy Scholars concerned that their high school and college experience is irreparably broken. They’re afraid they can’t go back, or continue, or achieve in the way they hoped. Their parents are scared that they don’t know how to help their children.

These fears are founded on evidence. By the time students come to Ivy Scholars, their lack of fit with their educational system has sunk into normality. Positive experiences of school are in the past, and the present is full of problems that are getting managed rather than resolved. Resolution may look impossible, or at least, impossibly difficult.

Some students come to Ivy Scholars with preexisting mental health concerns, referred by a psychologist, psychiatrist, social worker, or family physician. Others come just having felt the anxiety and sadness that naturally accompany feelings of alienation, of being in the wrong place, unable to fit in or adapt. Many are convinced that Ivy Scholars will be wrong for them in the same way every other educational institution was wrong for them.

To placate parents, and for lack of a better option, they come to a class. Then they come to another.

Change is slow. Nobody’s life becomes ideal overnight, but it gets better. Parts of math they never quite understood are made clear. Explicit critical reading techniques aid comprehension. Scientific subjects are broken down into smaller concepts until they eventually become simple.

Students learn to manage their time and organize their efforts. They start using – really using – calendars, getting used to visualizing the tasks to which they commit their waking hours. Most are surprised; they find their memory has been amplifying their failures and downplaying their successes. They find little places to make improvements, cutting out a nap here, adding a 30-minute block of uninterrupted study time there. They make bigger-picture plans, carving up larger projects into bite-sized chunks that they plot out hourly over the course of weeks.

Things get easier. Ivy Scholars students get better at accomplishing the tasks they set their mind to. They get better at understanding the obstacles they face, creating plans to deal with them, finding resources to help them, and executing on their vision.

One of our students sent me the comic below (credit to its creator) to describe her feelings for the first few months. I thought it was clever; every day, the zone gets a little bigger

31% of high schoolers report feeling overwhelmed or hopeless

89% of college students report a mentor made their life in high school "significantly better"

100% of college dropouts at Ivy Scholars return and complete their 4 year degree

100% of high school dropouts at Ivy Scholars earn their GED

30,000 success stories. Start your story today.

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